Near East School of Theology (NEST), Beirut Lebanon

NEST collage
The Near East School of Theology (N.E.S.T.) is an interconfessional Protestant Seminary in Beirut, Lebanon, serving the evangelical churches of the Middle East . The primary purpose of the School is to train pastors and church workers for ministry in the churches and other evangelical organizations in the Middle East . It is also concerned with continuing education for pastors and church workers in active service and with theological education of the laity.
The N.E.S.T. welcomes candidates from other Middle Eastern churches, as well as any person seeking to learn about Protestant theology and faith, irrespective of his or her religious affiliation. Students from beyond the Middle East, who have a special interest in Biblical Studies against the cultural background of the Middle East , Islamics or Oriental and Orthodox churches, are also welcome.

Click here to go to the NEST website.

 Breaking News:

Salam

The most pressing needs these days are for aid for students from Syria. A few days before NEST’s academic year started, a new student from Aleppo turned up. Here is her story:

Salam:  Arrived at NEST on Sept. 23 from a very dangerous area in Aleppo taking a very risky road. She is 22 and for the past 4 years her family has been living under siege in a Christian quarter in Aleppo. She has a BA from the University of Aleppo, and we have accepted her for a Master of Divinity. Her father, who is an evangelical minister, working with the Armenian Protestants of Aleppo and running a medical dispensary and pastoring a small congregation, accompanied her, but he will be returning back to Aleppo soon,  leaving his daughter under our care here. She is bright and wants to continue her studies (once her emotions settle). We are trying to raise some funds for her abroad, and so far we have raised $ 4200 out of the needed total of  ca. $ 13,000 (the cost of a full time student for 9 months at NEST).

destroyed church in Aleppo

 Syria’s Christian community is one of the oldest in the world, going back 2 millennia. Antioch, an ancient hub of Christianity, is where Jesus’ followers first adopted the title “Christians.” It was on the road to Damascus, where Paul saw God and converted to Christianity.

Today, Christians in Syria risk death everyday.  In 2010 there were 1.1 million Christians in Syria. Today there are about 260,000. At least 220 Syrian Christians have been kidnapped. Thousands have been killed, more displaced. As of May 2015 63 Christian churches were destroyed by airstrikes or bulldozers. There have been some 650 impact strikes in Aleppo, home to one of the largest Christian communities in Syria.

 

Click here to read NEST’s Newsletter Dec. 2015

The December newsletter contains many excellent updates on what NEST students and faculty are doing, including how they are helping Christian Assyrian refugee children.NEST helping syrian refugee children

 

 

 

 

 

UN syrian refugee image in Lebanon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lebanon today faces an unprecedented challenge to manage both its own population and Syrian refugees. It has the highest per capita concentration of refugees in the world and more global support, including for long-term development, is urgently needed. Lebanon today faces an unprecedented challenge to manage both its own population and Syrian refugees. It has the highest per capita concentration of refugees in the world and more global support, including for long-term development, is urgently needed. To date Lebanon has only received 45% of the $1.87 billion USD needed to take care of the refugees.

 Here’s what  Kids Alive Lebanon is doing to help:  Syrian Refugees – Crisis in Lebanon